5 Humanity Legends Who Devoted Their Lives For Common People

Top Humanity Legends and Their Services for Humanity:

Mother Teresa

Mother Teresa was the founder of the Order of the Missionaries of Charity, a Roman Catholic congregation of women dedicated to helping the poor. Considered one of the greatest humanitarians of the 20th century, she was canonized as Saint Teresa of Calcutta in 2016.

Mother Teresa quickly translated this somewhat vague calling into concrete actions to help the city’s poor. She began an open-air school and established a home for the dying destitute in a dilapidated building she convinced the city government to donate to her cause. In October 1950, she won canonical recognition for a new congregation, the Missionaries of Charity, which she founded with only a handful of members—most of them former teachers or pupils from St. Mary’s School.

humanity legends

As the ranks of her congregation swelled and donations poured in from around India and across the globe, the scope of Mother Teresa’s charitable activities expanded exponentially. Over the course of the 1950s and 1960s, she established a leper colony, an orphanage, a nursing home, a family clinic and a string of mobile health clinics.

In 1971, Mother Teresa traveled to New York City to open her first American-based house of charity, and in the summer of 1982, she secretly went to Beirut, Lebanon, where she crossed between Christian East Beirut and Muslim West Beirut to aid children of both faiths. In 1985, Mother Teresa returned to New York and spoke at the 40th anniversary of the United Nations General Assembly. While there, she also opened Gift of Love, a home to care for those infected with HIV/AIDS.

Nelson Mandela

Rolihlahla Mandela was born into the Madiba clan in the village of Mvezo, Transkei, on 18 July 1918. His mother was Nonqaphi Nosekeni and his father was Nkosi Mphakanyiswa Gadla Mandela, principal counsellor to the Acting King of the Thembu people, Jongintaba Dalindyebo. In 1930, when he was 12 years old, his father died and the young Rolihlahla became a ward of Jongintaba at the Great Place in Mqhekezweni.

When Nelson Mandela was a young man, white and black people in South Africa lived separate lives under a system called apartheid.

White people, who were a small part of the population, were in charge of the country.

humanity legends

It was illegal for black people to use the same schools, hospitals, and even beaches as white people. Conditions in whites-only schools and hospitals were much better. This man played important role in providing equal human rights to black people and stood in the line of top humanity legends.

Black people were also denied basic rights – like being allowed to vote in elections.

But Nelson Mandela believed that everybody should be treated equally.

Mandela joined a political party called the African National Congress (ANC) and later co-founded the ANC Youth League, leading protests against apartheid.

The prison cell that Nelson Mandela occupied on Robben Island.

This was Mandela’s prison cell – now a museum. Sometimes the demonstrations turned violent and in 1964 Mandela was sentenced to life in prison on Robben Island.

While Mandela was in prison photos of him were banned and it was even illegal to quote him in public.

But people from all over the world campaigned for his release. Songs were written and big concerts were held in protest. Finally, in 1990 the South African President FW de Klerk – a white man – allowed him to go free.

Mandela had spent 27 years in jail and was greeted as a hero on his release.

Mandela is famous for promoting a message of forgiveness and equality.

Apartheid was abolished in 1991, and three years later South Africa held its first elections in which black people, as well as white, were allowed to vote.

Nelson Mandela was elected President and set about trying to bring people of different races together.

In 1993 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize – the highest honor of its kind – for his work.

In 1995 South Africa held its first major sports competition, the Rugby World Cup.

Mandela gave his support to the South African team, made up mostly of white men, which helped to unite the country.

He became one of the world’s most popular leaders, with politicians and celebrities queuing up to have their photo taken with him. Even though Nelson Mandela helped to change South Africa into a fairer place, the country still has lots of problems today, including poverty, violent crime and disease.

But he’ll be remembered around the world for his message of peace and unity.

John Paul II

Pope John Paul II made history in 1978 by becoming the first non-Italian pope in more than 400 years.

He was A vocal advocate for human rights, John Paul often spoke out about suffering in the world. He held strong positions on many topics, including his opposition to capital punishment. A charismatic figure, John Paul used his influence to bring about political change and is credited with the fall of communism in his native Poland. He was not without critics, however. Some have stated that he could be harsh with those who disagreed with him and that he would not compromise his hard-line stance on certain issues, such as contraception.

humanity legends

In his later years, John Paul’s health appeared to be failing and the great among humanity legends drawn towards end. At public appearances, he moved slowly and seemed unsteady on his feet. He also visibly trembled at times. One of his doctors also disclosed that John Paul had Parkinson’s disease, a brain disorder often characterized by shaking, in 2001. But there was never any official announcement about his illness from the Vatican.

Abdul Sattar Edhi

Abdul Sattar Edhi proved you can do amazing things even in places where resources are lacking. He was an ascetic in a country where corrupt politicians regularly skim millions of dollars, a humanitarian in a nation riven with sectarian violence, and a provider of public services in a state where government has often failed to make the most basic of social goods, like adequate hospitals and ambulances, available.

top humanity legends

Even before there was a Pakistan, Edhi was helping the needy and the poor. His journey of self-sacrifice began in colonial India, at the age of nineteen, when he became caretaker to his mother, who was ill at the time. The experience made Edhi think deeply about the many people who had no one to care for them when they fell ill or suffered a debilitating life event. Both then and now, in South Asia, there were few if any social services to help the disabled, the mentally and physically ill, the poor, and other vulnerable communities.

Edhi decided to dedicate himself to filling this gap, supporting and providing for communities neglected by government and society.

Lady Diana:

Princess Diana was Princess of Wales while married to Prince Charles. One of the most adored members of the British royal family, she died in a 1997 car crash.

British royalty Princess Diana Spencer was born on July 1, 1961, near Sandringham, England. Diana, Princess of Wales, was one of the most adored members of the British royal family.

top humanity legends

She became Lady Diana Spencer after her father inherited the title of Earl Spencer in 1975. Although she was known for her shyness growing up, she did show an interest in music and dancing. Diana also had a great fondness for children. After attending finishing school at the Institut Alpin Videmanette in Switzerland, she moved to London. She began working with children, eventually becoming a kindergarten teacher at the Young England School.

 

 

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Post Author: Farrukh Saeed

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